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    Learning Thai Everyday

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    D@shie
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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by D@shie on March 17th 2009, 5:02 pm

    wow updates... Razz


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    onimaru07
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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:04 pm

    D@shie wrote:wow updates... Razz

    syempre hahahaa..................

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:06 pm

    "Yes" and "no" are often also indicated by simply repeating the verb. So if the question was "Do you want to go ?", it would be answered by saying "want" or "don't want", rather than "yes" or "no". Chai is an general word for "yes", but it's less used than it's English equivalent. Men can also use krap, and women ka, to indicate agreement. These are the same words used at the end of sentences to be polite.

    **Pom is the polite way of saying "I / me" for a man in Thai, di-chan is the equivalent for a women. You're never likely to offend anyone by using either of these words, but there are also a lot of other words for 'I/Me' that can be used depending on the situation.

    There's a similarly large amount of words for "you". Khun is the most common, and is a safe word to use when speaking to just about anybody. Tan is a very respectful word, used when talking to someone of markedly higher status than you in Thailand (e.g. a high court judge, or a Buddhist monk). Ter is more informal than khun, it's used when talking to friends.

    Sa-wàt dee is the general all purpose greeting in Thailand, the English distinctions of "Good morning", "Good afternoon" etc.. do exist but are almost never used. It's also almost always followed by kráp (for a man) or kâ (for a woman) to be polite.

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:09 pm

    Below is a list of pronouns meaning 'I/Me' in Thai, in approximate order of how common they are in everyday speech. Although there is a great range of pronouns, they're actually used quite sparingly and often omitted unless it's absolutely necessary to convey the meaning. For instance, to say 'Where are you going ?' in Thai is just bpai nai (literally 'go where ?') - no pronoun necessary.

    Though this list may seem pretty intimidating, you can get by perfectly fine in almost any situation you are likely to come across by knowing only chan, pom and di-chan.


    chan

    ฉัน

    This is most common word used by women, and can be used in any situation that's not especially formal. Men can use chan also, but it's much less common and is only used very informally. In Thai love songs sung by men, for instance, they always use chan to refer to themselves.

    pom

    ผม
    This is the normal word for "I / Me" used by men, which can safely be used at pretty much anytime talking to anybody. When talking to friends though, a less formal word is likely to be used instead.

    di-chan

    ดิฉัน
    This is used only by women. It's a safe word to use for most situation but is quite formal, so it's unlikely to be used when talking with friends.

    pee

    พี่
    Literally meaning "older brother / sister", this is quite a common word that can be used for 'I' when you speaking to someone younger than you. .

    norng

    น้อง
    The opposite of pee, this means "younger brother / sister". and can be used to mean 'I' when talking to people older than you.

    [More information on pee / norng]

    gra-pom

    กระผม
    This is another word used only by men, and it's used to show respect when talking to people perceived to be of 'higher status' than you. For instance, the porter in an expensive hotel might say it when talking to a hotel guest.

    rao

    เรา
    Confusingly, this is the normal word for 'we/us' but it is also used by both men and women as an informal word for 'I/me'.

    goo

    กู
    This is sometimes used by Thais when talking with close friends. In almost any other context (even a husband/wife conversation), it is offensive and only used as an insult to the listener. As a foreigner, you're better off avoiding it altogether. When used, it's almost always combined with meung which is a similarly offensive word for 'you'.

    noo

    หนู
    Literally meaning 'mouse', this is used by women when speaking to people much older. For instance, a Thai women talking to her parents will often say it. It can also be used as a word for 'you', 'him', 'her' etc if talking to/about a young child.

    ua

    อั้ว
    This is a word used only by Chinese Thais.

    dtai-tao

    ใต้เท้า
    Literally meaning 'under your feet', this is a respectful word similar to gra-pom.

    kah-pa-jao

    ข้าพเจ้า

    This is a very formal word for 'I/Me' that is almost never heard in normal speech, but can be found written occasionally. For instance, when you have to sign an immigration form to enter Thailand, the declaration in Thai uses kah-pa-jao as the word for 'I'.

    kah-pa-pra-put-ta-jao

    ข้าพพระพุทธเจ้า
    This is a Royal Thai word, and is only used by those in conversation with the Thai King or another member of the Royal Family. That being the case, it's not a word you're likely to hear often, except at the cinema where it's the first word of the royal anthem played before every film. Literally translated, it means 'The servant of the Lord Buddha.'

    Be warned that if you say this word in the wrong context, it may be taken as mocking the royal family and could land you in trouble.

    This is not a definitive list of words (some sections of society e.g. royalty and the military have their own words that only they use, and family relationship terms are also often used as pronouns), but it includes most of the main ones.

    One of the most common ways for women to speak about themselves isn't listed though, which is the habit of using their first name instead of any pronoun and so speak about themselves in the third person. Though men can do this also, it's not very common and sounds a bit effeminate so it's not a good habit to get in to.

    Another common way of speaking is by referring to your position or title instead of using a pronoun. For instance, a teacher talking to his students may use a-jahn (meaning 'teacher') as a word for 'I/Me' instead of one of the pronouns above.

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:10 pm

    Below is a list of pronouns meaning 'You' in Thai, in approximate order of how common they are in everyday speech. Although there is a great range of pronouns, they're actually used quite sparingly and often omitted unless it's absolutely necessary to convey the meaning. For instance, to say 'Where are you going ?' in Thai is just bpai nai (literally 'go where ?') - no pronoun necessary. Though this list might seem quite long, in reality you can easily survive knowing only khun.

    khun

    คุณ
    Khun is a polite and very common word meaning 'You', which is appropriate for most everyday situations you will come across. It also doubles as the title put in front of people's name to be polite e.g. Mr Somchai would be known in Thai as Khun Somchai.

    ter

    เธอ
    Ter is a more informal word for 'you' that can be used with friends or people you know well.

    pee

    พี่
    Literally meaning "older brother / sister", this is quite a common word that can be used when you speaking to someone older than you.

    norng

    น้อง
    The opposite of pee, this means "younger brother / sister". and can be used when talking to people younger than you.

    [More information on pee/norng]

    tan

    ท่าน
    Tan is a very respectful word for you that is only used when talking to monks or others at a similary high level in Thai society.

    meung / ayng / gair

    มึง / เอง / แก
    These is sometimes used by Thais when talking with close friends. In almost any other context, they are offensive words and only used as an insult to the listener. As a foreigner, you're better off avoiding it altogether. When used, they are often combined with goo which is a similarly offensive word for 'I/Me'.

    noo

    หนู
    Literally meaning 'mouse', this is used to either to talk to very young children or to women who are much younger than the speaker. For instance, parents talking to their daughter will often use it, even if the daughter is an adult herself.

    leu

    ลื้อ
    This is a word used only by Chinese Thais.

    dtai-fah-la-orng-tulee-pra-baht

    ใต้ฝ่าละอองธุลีพระบาท
    This is a Royal Thai word, and is only used by those addressing the Thai King or Queen. The degree of reverence that the Royal Family is held in in Thailand can be seen with this word, which translates as (the speaker being) 'under the dust which is beneath the soles of your royal feet'.

    Be warned that if you say this word in the wrong context, it may be taken as mocking the royal family and could land you in trouble.

    This is not a definitive list of words (some sections of society e.g. royalty and the military have their own words that only they use, and family relationship terms are also often used as pronouns), but it includes most of the main ones.

    A common way of saying 'you' which isn't listed is just using someone's name instead of a pronoun, and talk about them in the third person. Also, someone's title or position can be used instead of using a pronoun. For instance, students talking to their teacher will use a-jahn (meaning 'teacher') as a word for 'you' instead of one of the pronouns above.

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:11 pm

    Asking questions in Thai is relatively straightforward, though there's a few different ways of doing it depending on what time of question you want to ask. An important thing to remember is not to automatically change the tone of your voice to indicate a question on the last word of the sentence (as English speakers naturally would), as this can interfere with the Thai tones.

    The most common way is simply to add the word ไหม at the end of a sentence, which can be thought of as the equivalent of a question mark.

    คุณชอบไหม - Do you like it ? (literally "you like %translitไหม%")

    - ชอบ - Yes, I like it (literally "like")
    - ไม่ชอบ - No, I don't like it (literally "not like")

    If you are asking for confirmation, then you can use ใช่ไหม instead (ใช่ on it's own means "yes"). This is roughly equivalent to "isn't it?" or "is that right?" in English.

    คุณจะมาเมืองไทยวันที่ 5 ใช่ไหม - You're coming to Thailand on the 5th aren't you? (literally "you will come Thailand day 5 %translitใช่ไหม%)

    - ใช่ - Yes, I am (literally "yes")
    - ไม่ใช่ - No, I'm not (literally "not yes")

    Another very common structure is to use the word หรือ (though normally pronounced as หลอ). This tends to be used when asking questions you think you already know the answer to, similar to a "so......then ?" structure in English.

    คุณกินอาหารเผ็ดไม่ได้หรื่อ So you can't eat spicy food then? (literally "you eat food spicy not can %translitหรื่อ%)

    - ใช่ - Yes, that's right (literally "yes")
    - ไม่ใช่ - No, I can eat spicy food (literally "not yes")

    หรื่อยัง, literally "or not yet?", is used in questions where it's expected the action being asked about will happen at some point even if not quite yet. These type of questions can be replied to by repeating the verb and adding the word แล้ว meaning "already", or say ยัง "not yet" to reply in the negative.

    ง่วงนอนหรื่อยัง Are you tired ? (literally "tired or not yet")

    - ง่วงนอนแล้ว Yes I am (literally "tired already")
    - ยังไม่ง่วงนอน No I'm not (literally "not yet tired")

    หรื่อเปล่า and หรื่อไม่, both literally meaning "or not?" are also frequently used. Unlike in English where asking an "or not?" question may be considered abrubt or rude, it's considered a normal way of showing you want a straight answer in Thai and is perfectly acceptable. These can be answered in a similar way to the ไหม type questions.

    คุณจะไปหรื่อเปล่า - Are you going to go (or not?) (literally "you will go or not")

    - ไป Yes I will (literally "go")
    - ไม่ไป (literally "not go") or เปล่า (literally "no"), both meaning No I won't go

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:11 pm

    One of the aspects of Thai that is very different from most other languages is the staggering number of pronouns that are available and used in everyday speech. With over a dozen words for 'I/Me' and a similar number for 'you', knowing which one to use and when can seem like a daunting task. The choice of which one to use depends on just about everything - who you're talking to, how well you know them, how old you are relative to them and, most importantly, the relationship between you and who is of 'higher status'. This is a choice that has to be made countless times a day in every conversation you have, which is effortless for a Thai but poses quite a problem for non-native speakers.

    Thankfully, no-one expects a non-Thai to have a perfect understanding of all the pronouns available and by learning just a few you can cope in almost any situation you are likely to find yourself in without offending anyone. These are shown below:

    pom


    This is the normal word for 'I / Me' that is used by men. It's slightly formal (few Thai men would use it when talking with friends), but still perfectly okay for most situations you'll find yourself in.

    di-chan / chan

    / Di-chan is used only by women, and is a polite word for 'I/Me'. The shortened form, chan, is less formal but fine for everyday use and is probably the most common word used by women.

    More words for 'I/Me'...
    khun


    This is a polite and very common word meaning 'You'. It also doubles as the title put in front of people's name to be polite e.g. Mr Somchai would be known in Thai as Khun Somchai.

    ter


    Ter is another word for you, used with friends or in informal situations.

    More words for 'You'...

    rao


    This is a word for 'we/us' that can be used in any situation.

    kao


    Kao is a standard word for 'he/him/she/her' that can be used in any situation.

    man


    This means 'it', and is used when referring to animals or things. It can also be used instead of kao to refer to people, but to do this is, not surprisingly, very insulting to the person you're referring to. (In some Thai dialects, man is actually a common way to refer to someone so you can't necessarily assume it's an insult if you hear it.)

    puak-kao


    This is a standard word for 'They/them' that can be used in any situation.

    pee / norng

    /

    Pee (literally 'older brother or sister') and norng (literally 'younger brother or sister') are very commonly used as pronouns, and can be used to mean either 'I', 'Me', 'You', 'Him', 'her', 'he' or 'she' depending on the situation. The difference is when they can be used - pee must be used referring to someone older and norng must be used, not surprisingly, when referring to someone younger.

    Despite their literal translation, using pee or norng doesn't necessarily imply a close relationship between the speakers. Though they are often used between friends and even married couples (as well as actual brothers and sisters), they are just as likely to be used when calling the attention of waiters/waitresses in restaurants or the porter in a hotel. If you often find you are asked your age when talking to a Thai, it is most likely they are doing so to establish who is pee and who is norng.

    The problem with this system is that without asking it means having to guess the age of other people relative to your own, and hoping you don't offend anyone too much ! It's also worth being careful with the pronunciation of pee, as if said with the wrong tone there is a unfortunate change in meaning from 'older brother or sister' to 'ghost/spirit'.

    If there is a substantial age difference (say, 25 or 30+ years) then pee and norng are not used.

    Though this list is okay for most situations, none of these words are really appropriate if you are in conversation with someone perceived to be of substantially 'higher status' than you. For instance, if you were unfortunate enough to find yourself in a Thai court and in conversation with the judge, a more respectful pronouns should be used instead. Luckily, for the average visitor to Thailand it is very unlikely that you'll encounter many, if any, situations such as this.

    Buddhist monks are another example where respectful pronouns should be used, as they have pretty much the highest status of all apart from royalty. In reality though, monks in touristy temples are probably very used to foreigners not using the correct pronouns, and are unlikely to be offended if you forget. The respective pages on words used for 'I' and words for 'you' have more information on respectful pronouns.

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chiruruzu on March 17th 2009, 5:18 pm

    D@shie wrote:Uhmmm... pano kaya kung "di-tiyak" ang gender... Suspect Question

    lol! naman dashie., tawang tawa ako dito., lol!

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by D@shie on March 17th 2009, 5:22 pm

    chiruruzu wrote:
    D@shie wrote:Uhmmm... pano kaya kung "di-tiyak" ang gender... Suspect Question

    lol! naman dashie., tawang tawa ako dito., lol!

    Ang ibig sabihin ko... pano kung common noun... ikaw talaga kung anu-ano ang iniisip mo... tongue Razz lol!


    _________________
    If only I have five lives!
    Then I could be from five different towns,
    and stuff myself full of five different types of food
    and have five different jobs...


    And I could...


    Fall inlove with the same person five times!


    - Orihime Inoue




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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chiruruzu on March 17th 2009, 5:28 pm

    D@shie wrote:
    chiruruzu wrote:
    D@shie wrote:Uhmmm... pano kaya kung "di-tiyak" ang gender... Suspect Question

    lol! naman dashie., tawang tawa ako dito., lol!

    Ang ibig sabihin ko... pano kung common noun... ikaw talaga kung anu-ano ang iniisip mo... tongue Razz lol!

    lol! yun nga ibig sabihin ko lol! hay naku problema na ng mga thai yan noh., bakit kasi ang arte-arte ng drama nila., rabbit rabbit rabbit

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:36 pm

    ahahahah katuwa nmn yan di tiyak???????? hehehehehe research ko hahaha para may maipost heheheeheh...............

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chiruruzu on March 17th 2009, 5:48 pm

    try mo., kahit nga yung greeting nilang "sawa dee hap" (not sure of the spelling) ang daming variations., Very Happy

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by onimaru07 on March 17th 2009, 5:52 pm

    chiruruzu wrote:try mo., kahit nga yung greeting nilang "sawa dee hap" (not sure of the spelling) ang daming variations., Very Happy


    correct marmi ata version ang spelling nila hahaahaha.............................

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by witwisit&me on April 12th 2009, 1:20 pm

    Always use "krub" (for men) and "ka" (for women) when you want to respect.


    "khorb khun" ---- "Thank you".


    "mai ben rai" ------ "it's ok".


    "khor thot" -------- "sorry".


    "sia jai" ------- "sorry"(case:someone died or got hurt)
    e.g
    "phom/di-chan sia jai" which means "I am sorry".




    source: http://www.learningthai.com/polite.html

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on April 12th 2009, 1:42 pm

    I love this thread!

    Kop koon ka!



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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on April 12th 2009, 2:05 pm

    onimaru07 wrote:Below is a list of pronouns meaning 'I/Me' in Thai, in approximate order of how common they are in everyday speech. Although there is a great range of pronouns, they're actually used quite sparingly and often omitted unless it's absolutely necessary to convey the meaning. For instance, to say 'Where are you going ?' in Thai is just bpai nai (literally 'go where ?') - no pronoun necessary.

    Though this list may seem pretty intimidating, you can get by perfectly fine in almost any situation you are likely to come across by knowing only chan, pom and di-chan.


    chan

    ฉัน

    This is most common word used by women, and can be used in any situation that's not especially formal. Men can use chan also, but it's much less common and is only used very informally. In Thai love songs sung by men, for instance, they always use chan to refer to themselves.

    Kaya pala sa "Kop Khoon Gan Lae Gan" ginamit is ter kop chan... not ter kop pom!


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    --- Kop Koon Gan Lae Gan by Witwisit Hiranyawongkul




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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on April 12th 2009, 2:17 pm

    Hey!

    If possible, pwede palagay na rin yung tone ng pronunciation. Kasi nga diba. Thai is tonal.


    Kop koon ka!


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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on April 17th 2009, 4:47 pm

    Question:

    Okay, so I'm watching LOS again when I noticed something. There are times when the characters refer to themselves or the person they're talking to by their names, not "you" or "I" or "me". Here are examples:

    --- In the scene where Tong hands Mew the map to go find the doll, Tong says "This is for Mew", not "This is for you".

    - In the scene where June (as Tang) is asked to say grace by Korn, she says "Tang will lead the prayer", not "I will lead the prayer".

    - In the party scene, June says to her friend "Tang remembers", not "I remember".

    - When Donut asks Tong why he hasn't responded to her calls, she says "You've been cold to Donut lately", not "You've been cold to me lately".

    These are what I can remember.

    Is it really like this in Thai, using your name rather than I or me? And why?


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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by acquydaubo on April 17th 2009, 8:23 pm

    I've been learning Thai for 5 months. It's really hard when I have to learn English and Thai at the same time. (Now, another language: Tagalog) ^^....
    Thanks for your post. It's very useful.
    Love.

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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on April 17th 2009, 8:28 pm

    acquydaubo wrote:I've been learning Thai for 5 months. It's really hard when I have to learn English and Thai at the same time. (Now, another language: Tagalog) ^^....
    Thanks for your post. It's very useful.
    Love.

    I know right! I love it too!


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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by Eustace on May 2nd 2009, 2:21 pm

    i didn't expect that learning thai can be this difficult yet its easy too...

    and its fun!!!

    chanrakter
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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on May 3rd 2009, 10:08 am

    Eustace wrote:i didn't expect that learning thai can be this difficult yet its easy too...

    and its fun!!!

    It is!

    Learning languages, when done with love, is fun!


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    Jaisus
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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by Jaisus on May 5th 2009, 7:15 pm

    saya..

    sana matu2

    ako ng thai ^_^

    grace
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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by grace on May 8th 2009, 7:50 pm

    di-chun sabai dee.

    =)

    learning different languages is fun..
    memorizing it is the real challenge.
    =))

    chanrakter
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    Re: Learning Thai Everyday

    Post by chanrakter on May 9th 2009, 12:10 am

    grace wrote:di-chun sabai dee.

    =)

    learning different languages is fun..
    memorizing it is the real challenge.
    =))

    Yeah, but it's part of the thrill of it!


    _________________
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    A heart that has never learnt to love is weak
    --- Kop Koon Gan Lae Gan by Witwisit Hiranyawongkul




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